American Printmakers On-line Catalogue Raisonné Project
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The Prints of Luis Quintanilla:
A Catalogue Raisonné
(in progress)
Thumbnails, Part IV
Prints Made for Illustrated Books
(not included in the catalogue raisonné proper)
(See below for an explanation.)
Table of Contents
To navigate this
catalogue raisonné,
choose from the links below.
Thumbnails, Part 4:
Prints made for Illustrated Books
(These prints are not included in the catalogue raisonné proper.)
A Biographical Chronology
of the artist (and its accompanying linked pages) appears on the website
The Art and World of
Luis Quintanilla

To navigate
The American Printmakers On-line Catalogue Raisonné Project, choose from the links below.
Useful Links
Copyright ©
2006-2007
by Jeffrey Coven
Quintanilla made prints that appeared in three published books: All the Brave (1939), Swift's Gulliver's Travels (1947) and Cervantes' Three Exemplary Novels (1950). He also created prints intended to appear in two books that were never published: Life in Manhattan (c. 1939-1940) and Poe's "The Raven" and "The Bells" (c. 1950).

The prints made for two of these books, All the Brave and Life in Manhattan are included in the catalogue raisonné proper and may be viewed by clicking their respective links just above.

Selected prints made for the other three (Gulliver's Travels, Three Exemplary Novels and "The Raven" and "The Bells" may be viewed by using the links further down this page. These prints are not included in the catalogue raisonné for several reasons:

First, and most importantly, the method of creation for these three falls outside, or at least on the edge, of the definition of what is required to constitute an original print, in that the image on the plate involves a photo-mechanical process.

To make the prints, Quintanilla derived his own process which allowed him to draw his images directly onto coated, translucent cellophane sheets. This provided a drawing surface much closer to paper than drawing in a ground covered plate in the manner traditionally used in etching. Then by passing light through the cellophane onto a zinc plate covered with a photosensitive emulsion, he could transfer the image to the plate. Finally, by means of an application of acid, the image was etched onto the plate from which the impressions would be printed. Like photographic negatives, the blacks and whites on the cellophanes are reversed, but when printed regain their original orientation. (The above is an abridgement of material taken from Quintanilla, Paul. Waiting at the Shore. 94-95).

Second, only the prints made for All the Brave and Life in Manhattan do not serve to illustrate the work of authors but stand on their own as wholly conceived by the artist.

Third, only among the prints made for All the Brave and Life in Manhattan can impressions be found that are signed by the artist -- suggesting he considered these works as worthy of standing on their own as part of his print oeuvre.

(Click the image or the title below to view selected illustrations from the three publications not included in the catalogue raisonné proper.)


Gulliver's Travels

by

Jonathan Swift

Three Exemplary Novels

by

Miguel de Cervantes

"The Raven" and "The Bells"

by

Edgar Allen Poe

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This page last revised: Wednesday, January 03, 2007